Wednesday, March 05, 2008

Famous Artists Course: Folds, Part 2

March 2nd was the two-year anniversary of this blog. This is the 188th post.

I wish I had more time to blog these days but things are very very busy.

Here is part two (of two) on drawing folds from the Famous Artists Course.

All of this information might seem overwhelming but just remember above all else that one side of the cloth always has tension and the other side will be the slack or relaxed side (just like one side of the figure will be the "squash" side and one side will be the "stretch" side).

When I read this stuff a couple of years ago, I can't say that I actually remembered any of it afterwards but it did make me look at clothes and how people wore them in a new way. I started noticing how wrinkles formed and that helped me subconsciously get better at drawing simple wrinkles without getting caught up in drawing complicated shapes that are awkward or distracting...well-drawn fabric just "feels right" and adds to the gesture or direction of the drawing without calling attention to itself.








Some people might also be frustrated that this material, being 57 years old, is a little bit dated - people don't dress this way anymore. But folds are folds and the information is useful no matter what. It can be applied to anything.

I feel obligated to mention that I started this site to talk about storyboarding and everything that relates to story and storyboarding. There are many things a good story sketch needs to have and let me point out that well-drawn folds aren't on the list. But then again, most of the people who read this blog aren't really interested in story boarding so it's for anyone who wants to learn more about drawing.

My approach to everything in life is that if I'm going to learn anything about it then I always want to learn everything about it. Drawing is the same way...I want to learn everything I can no matter how mundane or trivial it might seem.

When I'm struggling with how to draw the nuts-and-bolts of something, I'm not able to focus on the more important parts of the drawing, like the emotion it's trying to convey or the greater story point that it's meant to service. A good drawing done just for the sake of being a good drawing to me is meaningless...a good drawing communicates something more than just the sum of it's parts.





23 comments:

Brian said...

Thanks for posting. Some good information. Folds are fun but can be confusing too.

Benjamin De Schrijver said...

Unbelievably valuable information! Thank you, and happy "blogiversary"!

willborough said...

Thanks for this post. It looks to be the most usefull description of folds I've ever read. I can't wait to sart studying these pages.

B

Cesare Asaro said...

I've been struggling with folds since I can remember, and I was unable to find material of this kind. Every one always say simplify, simplify, but never able to explain how. It is a jumble! to come up ahead is loads of research (time) before you get to boil it down to the nuts and bolts. At least now I know what to look for and I have shaved off hours and hours of work. As we all know time is gold. Thanks for helping out.

Guy Allen said...

Thanks so much for posting these.

teresa said...

Thanks for the post! My latest favorite place to sketch is sitting at customer service at work and drawing the customers waiting for concessions... I will have to pay closer attention to the folds in the clothes next time for sure! Thanks again and happy 2nd blogging birthday!

Patrick Smith said...

hey mark, what's the name of this author????

Eugene McDermott said...

Hey Mark,
I'm new to this blogging thing, though I've read yours for quite a while and I check in all the time to see what's new. I've gotta pounce on one thing though. You said most people reading this blog aren't that interested in storyboarding. I am and I hope that doesn't mean your going to stop posting regularly about storyboarding?!! I've been working in TV animation for 13 yrs but only the last 2 as a board artist. Your insights are always helpful and I hope you continue to post them. Love the blog and Happy Anniversary!!

E

Fabio Lai said...

Thanks a lot for the last two posts.
I've spent a lot of time trying to understand how the folds work, now I have clearer ideas.

k. borcz said...

Congrats on the anniversary. Yet again, much appreciate your postings.

Pinflux said...

Thank you thank you! These pages are great! :D I'm very glad you blog on a number of drawing-related subjects aside from purely storyboard - keep up the great work!

C. G. Leow said...

These notes are great! Thansk for sharing.

fedemilella said...

I just discovered this wonderful blog!!! Congratulations, it's really really interesting. Thanks for sharing

David Cousens said...

Happy anniversary Mark! I swear you manage to find all of the best learning resources.

Thanks again for posting, I realise that you're very busy and keeping the blog updated takes a lot of effort, but it's very much appreciated.

Cheers,
David

willipino said...

great post. i've always struggled with drapery.

Justin Hunt said...

Thank you for posting these!

vineet said...

happy anniversary ! love the blog!

LeoBro said...

Thanks for taking the considerable amount of time to scan and post these. Great info like this shouldn't be forgotten.

Randall.c said...

has anyone taken taken the time or effort to put these together in a pdf? that would be great.

Kevin Barber said...

Pure gold. Thanks Camel.

E. Will said...

THANK YOU!!! Clothing folds have always been a total mystery to me as well and these pages are going to be a HUGE help!!!!

viagra online said...

A good drawing done just for the sake of being a good drawing to me is meaningless...a good drawing communicates something more than just the sum of it's parts.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for posting these notes.