Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Famous Artists Course: Folds Part One

I've been meaning to scan and post this forever...

Every good drawing book has a section on drawing folds. They're all pretty much the same. That said, the best one I've ever seen is from the "Famous Artists Course". Here is the first of several parts. Click to see these really big.

There are a few types of folds that are generally accepted among every artist, and the FAC lays them out just like every other drawing book, but for some reason the FAC version really seemed to be better explained than any other version I've seen. There are a lot of very clear visuals to explain everything.

This is the first section, which covers the basics, and probably won't strike too many people as all that extraordinary. The next part is where it really steps beyond what you usually see and really lays out a lot of good information I haven't seen before. I will scan that part when I get a chance.

I put folds in the same category as anatomy. You should learn everything about anatomy and folds and all the other nuts and bolts of drawing as early as you can; then these things become second nature and you can forget all about them, which means when you're drawing you can focus on all the really hard and important parts of drawing: getting the right pose, the right expression, the best composition and everything else.

Really, folds are pretty simple to learn and master, and the simplest suggestion of fabric and clothes is always the best, unless it's an important story point or something. The best drawn folds are those that help articulate whatever pose and/or feeling you're trying to convey and don't call attention to themselves or fight the more important parts of the drawing.








17 comments:

Stephen said...

Mark, thanks for posting these. I love everything I've seen from the old Famous Artists Courses, and I appreciate the fact that you scan them and post them here when you can. I look forward to more.

Stephen
http://meetingedges.blogspot.com

Scott Sackett said...

Thanks for posting these! This is very timely as drapery is something I am working on right now.

Benjamin De Schrijver said...

Same here! Really useful at this time. Thanks a lot for posting! Hope to see the next parts soon...

CCG Coordinator said...

Hi Mark,

Thanks for a great post! Looking forward to the 2nd part. I really love these FAS excerpts - the Hollywood Animation Archive has posted several good ones. Do you have a set of the FAS courses? What year and course do you have? Any tips on acquiring a set? Colleen Doran, comic artist recommended E-Bay. But I'm a little unsure of differences in different years of the courses and not an experienced E-Bay buyer. Any advice?

Best wishes,

-Jonathan Gilpin

Sherm said...

Hey, Mark...thank you SO much for the great high-res quality scans! This is great material...Thanks a bunch!

Anonymous said...

thanks a lot , waiting impatiently for part 2


ashtak

mark kennedy said...

Stephen - glad you like them, thanks for letting me know!

scott - good, best of luck with it.

benjamin - great, I will post the rest as soon as I can...

ccg - yes, I have a set that I bought off of ebay. It is from the early 60s, I think, I am not sure and I don't have them at hand at the moment. Mine has all of the original members of the faculty involved, I think, including Norman Rockwell. It has 4 volumes and they all have a black cover.
It really is a great resource, although I haven't really delved into it all that much, truth be told.
Ebay is easy and you will be fine, as long as you buy from sellers with feedback that is positive. The other option involves getting the set through a used book site, like abebooks.com. The advantage is that you will see several listings and can compare the various years and see who the "authors" were of each set. It changed over the years.
Anyway I hope that helps!

sherm - glad you liked it.

anon - I know, I know, things are crazy these days..........

mark kennedy said...

Okay, I checked out my 4 volumes of the FAC. It's copyright date is 1950.

Hope that helps!

Munchanka said...

If only the masters had a lecture on ANIMATING drapery. Excellent blog, Mark. Most insightful!

Danesh said...

Thanks for posting this!

Kitty Forseth said...

This is wonderful, perfect! Thank you so much. I need to draw a cape, and have never mastered the sketching of folds.

~Kitty

homes for sale costa rica said...

was a very good article. I would like more information

niz said...

Hello .. firstly I would like to send greetings to all readers. After this, I recognize the content so interesting about this article. For me personally I liked all the information. I would like to know of cases like this more often. In my personal experience I might mention a book called Generic Viagra in this book that I mentioned have very interesting topics, and also you have much to do with the main theme of this article.

effects of viagra said...

Hello I enjoyed yoiur article. I think you have some good ideas and everytime i learn something new i dont think it will ever stop always new info , Thanks for all of your hard work!.

BirkeloArt said...

Thanks very much for sharing! I am finding my fine art degree included lots of nude figure drawing but never a study of the clothed figure. This helps a lot.

adson stone said...

Friends I want share with you some A dialogue is a conversation. Writing is a conversation between the writer and the reader. In our case, between the poet and the poetry readers. If you’re publishing your work, don’t pretend you don’t care what other people think of it if they don't seem to understand or like it. Of course you do! You're not going to please everybody all the time, so don't worry about the odd negative comment, but if people aren't responding as you'd like them to, try to see it as an opportunity. Take feedback on board, rewrite and perhaps even send a message to ask someone who has commented to comment again on your latest draft. One of the mistakes it's easy to make is writing about something with implications that seem obvious to you, but are not contained in the poem itself and so are unclear to someone who doesn't know you. Imagine reading it as someone who has no idea whether you’re old or young, male or female, American or Australian, a pupil or a teacher… is it as obvious now? If you want the dialogue you are having with unknown readers to improve, you have to learn to read your own poems from a stranger’s perspective. That is one of the most useful skills in improving your poetry. You can try it with something you’ve written now. Go through line by line from the beginning and try to write down what a stranger would interpret from what you’ve said. The picture will build up through the poem, but it may be that you can identify a place where you’ve assumed they will understand something that is obvious to you, but wouldn’t make sense without some piece of knowledge that you have about your life which is separate from the poem.social network for writers and artists

dsferew said...

People always remember that marriage cheap fifa 14 coins is the tomb of love! Do not understand at the time, began to understand now. Indeed, the married life will be to play down the friction fifa 14 coins in the period love, more should be said to live in love as gone. I feel that little bit of married life the mid-point of each other will drop into my feelings. Over time, no love, there is another cheap fifa 14 coins way to deeper feelings of affection that is.